WIOA Work Groups

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Governance and Communication

Planning and Implementation Policy

Performance Accountability and Data Sharing

One-Stop Operations and Delivery System Design

Career Pathways and Industry Partnerships

Services to Youth

Governance and Communication

The Governance work group focuses on the following:

  • determining local area designation
  • revising board membership requirements
  • identification of One-Stop Operators through a competitive process
  • crafting One-Stop certification standards
  • nurturing a continuous improvement culture, stretching finite resources, building team morale and collaboration and improving customer satisfaction and positive impact

Key action items include:

  • identification of regions (review initial labor market and economic data to identify labor market regions in Iowa)
  • defining the roles of state and local board members and providing technical assistance and training in board development
  • developing recommendations and implementing approved plans for legislative awareness, education and advocacy activities
  • developing a process for identification and dissemination of best practices
  • oversight and communication of work plans, timelines, and tracking progress of work groups

Discussion Questions

How can Iowa best support regional planning and coordination of services among local WIBs?  What are the benefits of regional collaboration among local areas?

What broad criteria should be used by local WIBs in the competitive selection of One-Stop Operators?

What strategies can local WIBs use to leverage additional resources?  What can the state do to support these efforts?

What can the state do to help build the capacity of local WIBs?

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Planning and Implementation Policy

The Planning and Implementation work group focuses on the following:

  • creating a state plan blueprint
  • identifying regional planning areas
  • continuous improvement plan for One-Stop system and WIOA system
  • establishing a local board certification process

Key action items include:

  • identification of regions (review initial labor market and economic data to identify labor market regions in Iowa)
  • revise and implement Local Workforce Investment Board certification requirements
  • assess and evaluate existing WIA policies determining and improving overall processes, policies and procedures in light of WIOA
  • develop policies and guidance to facilitate integrated service delivery
  • development of cost-allocation methodology to address funding of the One-Stop system
  • establish guidance for regional and local plan development
  • determine financial needs and required financial monitoring policies
  • identify new legislative requirements and clarify them, identify current requirements already being met and identify the requirements still needing action
  • develop a timeline and implement a schedule
  • develop a "parking lot" of potential future lean work that can improve the customer service experience and drive additional integration

Discussion Questions:

How can Iowa best support and encourage regional planning and coordination of services among local WIBs?  What are the benefits of regional collaboration among local areas?

What broad criteria should be used by local WIBs in the competitive selection of One-Stop Operators?

What strategies can local WIBs use to leverage additional resources?  What can the state do to support these efforts?

What can the state do to help build the capacity of local WIBs?

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Performance Accountability and Data Sharing

The Performance Accountability and Data Sharing work group focuses on:

  • implementing new performance accountability measures
  • refining the Educational Training Provider list process
  • developing recommendations for additional measures

Key action items include:

  • review new performance measures and identify potential issues (including recording and reporting information)
  • analyze current state of reporting requirements, identify gaps, efficiency opportunities needed and indicators of performance
  • develop a matrix of required data and reporting requirements 
  • coordinate with state leadership to identify performance requirements across agencies
  • develop IT scope of work guidelines for data sharing to successfully implement new data and reporting requirements
  • make recommendations regarding effective dissemination of performance data to stakeholders, the public, workforce customers, and program managers
  • Coordinate with the NGA Talent Pipeline grant team (which is also examining data and performance metrics)
  • Negotiate levels of performance and adjustment factors

Discussion Questions:

How can the state and local WIBs more effectively work together to ensure decision makers, at all levels, have access to useful and actionable performance information?

What “real time” measures can be calculated and provided to inform program decisions on the state and local level?

How can performance data be disseminated to key audiences to ensure transparency and accountability?

How should performance data be calculated and disseminated to support and inform regional planning and coordination?

How can ETPL requirements and the consumer report card for training providers be used to better support workforce development partners and job seekers?

What is the best way for the state to collect and capture credentialing data from training providers?

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One-Stop Operations and Delivery System Design

The One-Stop Operations and Delivery System Design work group focuses on:

  • Defining roles and responsibilities for state and local partnerships
  • Enhancing One-Stop partner coordination
  • Expanding system capacity

Key action items include:

  • Identify clear roles and responsibilities of the various One-Stop partners with an emphasis on the One-Stop operator and center staff
  • Develop uniform assessment tools and referral processes to ensure customers are referred to the appropriate services in a prompt manner
  • Develop processes and procedures to ensure proper and consistent referral to and from DVRS to enhance the pathway to competitive employment for persons with disabilities.
  • Develop procedures for common intake of applications and referral for individuals enrolled in adult education and individuals with barriers to employment
  • Develop a model for service delivery ensuring the local One-Stop operator controls and manages the flow of services to customers
  • Improve the use of technology in the One-Stop Centers
  • Ensure appropriate performance metrics are established to inform service delivery and to support the seamless, coordinated delivery of services by all One-Stop partners
  • Identify best practices for implementing work-based learning and training methods
  • Develop and expand business services outreach
  • Develop processes to ensure customers with significant barriers utilize the many opportunities available to achieve competitive employment
  • Implement communication tools and use those tools to keep a pulse on local area challenges
  • Develop an accessibility checklist and apply the checklist consistently throughout the state
  • Determine staff training needs and opportunities during the WIOA transition

Discussion Questions:

How can the state and local WIBs ensure better coordination of services among One-Stop partners?

How can the One-Stop Centers be structured to best serve job seekers and employers?

What are the key elements of a locally-driven One-Stop Center?

What can the state do to support the development of a stronger One-Stop Center system?

What should the role of Business Services be in the One-Stop Centers?

What kind of cross-training is available for One-Stop partners to best serve individuals with disabilities and other barriers to employment?

What more can be done to help ensure individuals with disabilities and other barriers are receiving pre-employment services?

What strategies can be used to ensure alignment of IVRS agencies and partner programs?

How can the workforce system better integrate services available to individuals with disabilities?

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Career Pathways and Industry Partnerships

The Career Pathways and Industry Partnerships work group focuses on:

  • Focusing literacy and training programs on career pathways
  • Enhancing services to employers
  • Integrating apprenticeship programs into the workforce development system

Key action items include:

  • Develop a common definition for career pathways that aligns with the WIOA definition and provides technical assistance in the development of new career pathway programs
  • Review state policies, procedures and training investments to support the development of new career pathways
  • Define “high-quality industry partnership” and provide workforce partners with technical assistance and training in the development of partnerships
  • Recommend guidelines for incumbent worker training
  • Recommend a planning process to ensure enhanced industry engagement and co-investment or resource leveraging
  • Continue the state effort in developing a list of industry-valued credentials
  • Identify resources and collaborate to increase the number of sector partnerships statewide

Discussion Questions:

How can Iowa strengthen the capacity of state and local partners to engage employers in the development of high-quality industry partnerships?

What is needed from the state to support the development of industry partnerships?

What steps can be taken to increase the number of individuals who obtain an industry-valued credential?

What is the appropriate role for adult basic education in helping individuals obtain credentials?

How can the workforce system expand the use of pre-apprenticeships, apprenticeships, internships, job shadowing, mentoring and career exploration?

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Services to Youth

The Services to Youth work group focuses on:

  • Expanding system capacity
  • Standards for 75 percent of out-of-school youth services
  • Improving work-based youth activities

Key action items include:

  • Develop strategies for connecting with, and serving, out-of-school youth
  • Identify promising practices being used to serve out-of-school youth
  • Improve work-based learning opportunities for youth
  • Build partnerships with the Department of Education, employers, education providers, training providers, community organizations and faith-based organizations to identify
  • Connect individuals to services to help lead to meaningful employment
  • Create strategies for delivering services for additional youth program requirements
  • Provide workforce partners with technical assistance and training in the outreach, training and retention of out-of-school youth
  • Identify strategies to provide activities that include financial literacy, entrepreneurship, career development and labor market information

Discussion Questions:

What are effective strategies for recruiting and retaining out-of-school youth?

What are some best practices for expanding paid and unpaid work experiences for youth?

How can pre-apprenticeship and apprentice programs be integrated into local youth services?

How can stakeholders work together to build career pathways for youth?

How can WIOA youth programs be connected to the broad array of other youth-focused workforce development and education programs in the state?

What are some strategies for expanding the capacity of local youth programs?

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